Martin Luther King Jr. Remembered by NAACP

Members of the community gathered for the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Breakfast Monday morning in Mounds.  The gathering, held at St. Raphael’s Hall, featured music, keynote speaker Rev. Kevin Anthony, and breakfast catered by Barbara Snow.

Master of Ceremony Bishop Derek Eurales opened the memorial with a prayer and the singing of the Negro National Anthem.  All in attendance joined in, starting the ceremony on a positive note.

The annual ceremony was sponsored by the Pulaski and Alexander County branches of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.   The NAACP was formed in 1909 as a civil rights organization aiming to improve the educational, social, and economic status of minority groups.

“We come to honor the dream because the struggle continues,” said Eurales.

The life and achievemnets of Martin Luther King Jr. were honored and remembered on the 85th anniversary of his birthday.

Many in the community saw the breakfast as a place to not only remember but educate.  Younger attendees were treated to a healthy dose of history and culture with their meal of eggs, bacon, and sausage. Local attendee Lenora Clark remarked on the importance of instilling the values Dr. King purveyed.

“We need more youth to take an interest in those who came before them and made the lives they live possible,” said Clark. “King was a rare and timeless example of someone worth molding your own life from.”  Keynote speaker Kevin Anthony spoke of the many struggles that dictated the lives of those who fought for the right to be treated equally.

“Many forget exactly what people went through to attain freedom for the present,” said Anthony.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. lives on through his wisdom and teachings, inspiring people across the world.  His message of unity and equal rights has carried far beyond his own life.

King is most widely known for his famous advancement of the civil rights movement and the “I Have a Dream” speech he delivered at a peaceful protest on the steps of the Lincoln Monument.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tenn. on March 29, 1968.  In 1983 President Regan signed a bill designating King’s birthday a federal holiday.

(Left to Right) Rev. Kevin Anthony, Minister Stephanie Fisher, and Richard Grigsby share a laugh at St. Raphael’s Hall Monday morning.  The annual rememberance breakfast held by the NAACP highlighted the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  King was a influencial figure in the civil rights movement, fighting for equality and justice.   The crowd celebrated what would be King’s 85th birthday, keeping the spirit of his beliefs and struggles alive. “We come to honor the dream because the struggle continues,” said Master of Ceremony  Bishop Derek Eurales during his welcome address. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
(Left to Right) Rev. Kevin Anthony, Minister Stephanie Fisher, and Richard Grigsby share a laugh at St. Raphael’s Hall Monday morning. The annual rememberance breakfast held by the NAACP highlighted the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. King was a influencial figure in the civil rights movement, fighting for equality and justice.
The crowd celebrated what would be King’s 85th birthday, keeping the spirit of his beliefs and struggles alive.
“We come to honor the dream because the struggle continues,” said Master of Ceremony Bishop Derek Eurales during his welcome address. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Rev. Kevin Anthony recieves his breakfast during the annual Martin Luther King Jr. remembrance breakfast in Mounds.  Anthony was the keynote speaker and brought a message of unity and positivity. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Rev. Kevin Anthony recieves his breakfast during the annual Martin Luther King Jr. remembrance breakfast in Mounds. Anthony was the keynote speaker and brought a message of unity and positivity. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Workers for Barbara Boo’s Catering sing along to the Negro National Anthem Monday morning at St. Raphael’s Hall in Mounds.  The Alexander and Pulaski County chapters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People hosted their annual Martin Luther King Junior Memorial Breakfast celebrating King’s 85th birthday.  -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Workers for Barbara Boo’s Catering sing along to the Negro National Anthem Monday morning at St. Raphael’s Hall in Mounds. The Alexander and Pulaski County chapters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People hosted their annual Martin Luther King Junior Memorial Breakfast celebrating King’s 85th birthday. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Aaron Oomeal performs a praise dance at St. Raphael’s Hall in Mounds Monday.  The annual rememberance breakfast highlighted the life and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Aaron Oomeal performs a praise dance at St. Raphael’s Hall in Mounds Monday. The annual rememberance breakfast highlighted the life and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

 

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

 

Cairo Man Charged With Diasaster Relief Fraud

Cairo Police Cheif Bernard F. Brown was indicted by a federal grand jury on charges of disaster relief fraud and making false statements.

The charges were filed by the U.S. District Court Southern District of Illinois Benton Office on December 3, 2013.

The charges state that Brown made multiple false statements regarding his place of residence in order to collect relocation assistance payments from FEMA in connection with Disaster Declaration DR-1991.

Brown, 48, stated in reports that he was residing at 316 3rd Street, Cairo, Ill. while his residence at 829 6th Street, Cairo, Ill. Authorities allege the defendant never left his residence.

Documents released by The United States’ District Court offer detailed accounts of the statements which were submitted as written claims between September 22, 2011 and June 7, 2012.

Also included in the indictment is a charge of disaster fraud.  The documents state that on  or about June 18, 2012, in Alexander County, Brown knowingly used false writings or documents  which he transmitted by facsimile to FEMA, knowing the same to contain materially false, ficticious, and fraudulant statements and representations, to wit: that because of severe flooding in Southern Illinois, he had changed his residence and was paying rent to occupy 316 3rd Street, Cairo, Illinois, and was entitled to relief from FEMA for reimbursement of such payment for rent.

The false statement charges carry a potential sentence of up to five years imprisonment, a $250,000 fine, and up to 3 years of supervised release.

The disaster relief fraud charge carries a  potential sentence of up to 30 years imprisonment, a $250,000 fine, and up to 5 years supervised release.

Under federal law, Brown is presumed innocent until proved guilty beyond a reasonable doubt to the satisfaction of a jury.

Brown’s trial is set for February 21, 2014, at the U.S. District Court in Benton, Ill.

The investigation of the case was conducted by the Department of Homeland Security and is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Thomas E. Leggans.

At time of press Brown could not be reached for statement.

 George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Hughes Trial Moves Forward

The legal proceedings in the case against Chauncey Hughes moved forward on Tuesday at the Alexander County courthouse.

Hughes is accused of murdering his wife Heather Davis on the evening of November 1.

Hughes was charged with five counts of first-degree murder and has been held at the Tri-County Detention Center in Ullin since turning himself in to authorities at State Police District 22 headquarters the night after Davis was found dead in her home.

The court heard testimony from State Police case agent Ryan Sykes on Tuesday.

Sykes stated that a call was recieved by the Cairo Police Department at 8:31 pm from 733 35th Street in Cairo, Davis’ residence.

When first responders arrived at the scene two neighbors were administering CPR to Davis who was unresponsive and observed to be bleeding from a gunshot wound.

Davis was transported to St. Francis Medical Center in Cape Girardeau where she was pronounced dead on arrival. The county coroner then determined that the gunshot was not self inflicted.

Investigators collected a spent nine millimeter handgun shell and casing as well as one live round when collecting evidence at the home.

Sykes also went on to elaborate that at 8:29 pm a report of a suspicious vehicle on Ohio Street.  The vehicle was commonly driven by Hughes.

Sykes stated that Heather Davis’ father, Ronald Davis, provided surveillance video from Mack’s Restaurant which clearly showed Chauncey Hughes with Heather Davis earlier in the day.  The two were in an argument about Heather speaking with customers at Mack’s Restaurant.

It was explained that upon turning himself in to authorities the following evening Hughes gave two different statements when being questioned.

In Hughes’ first statement he explained that after leaving Mack’s Restaurant he returned home with Heather.  He stated that he accidently discharged his weapon, shooting Davis.

The second statement indicated that he was arguing with Davis over showing their infant child to two men at Mack’s Restaurant earlier in the day.  Hughes stated that Davis struck him with her fists.  When she attempted to leave the home Hughes explained that he accidently fired a single shot hitting Davis in the chest.  Hughes then fled the scene.

After leaving the residence Hughes stated that he went to the river, near Ohio Street and threw the weapon into the river and contemplated suicide.

He was later driven to Tennessee where he was in hiding for much of the following day.  After returning to Paducah he was picked up by his parents and taken to Ullin where he turned himself over to authorities.

At District 22 headquarters Hughes requested an attorney.  He also spoke with Sheriff Timothy Brown who requested the presence of the Illinois State Police.  Sergeant Chad Brown of the Illinois State Police was on hand during the interview.

The mood was somber as many members of Heather Davis’ family were present in the court room on Tuesday., showing their solidarity and strength.

“Heather was such a well-liked person around town,” said Sue Shemwell, Heather’s grandmother. “She was a wonderful person who was only trying to better herself.”

Lisa Williams, Heather’s aunt, expressed how much the loss of her niece effected their family stating, “Life just won’t be the same without her being here.”

The next portion of the trial is scheduled at 1 pm on January 7 at the Alexander County courthouse.

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Cairo Library a Historical Gem

The Cairo Public Library is one of the city’s most prominent and interesting buildings, drawing in those traveling through the area and passing by.

The library has stood since 1884, allowing those interested the opportunity to behold architecture and historical artifacts housed inside.  The A.B. Safford Memorial Building was presented to the citizens of Cairo seven years after Mrs. Safford’s husband died in 1877.

As part of the dedication of the building Mrs. Safford stated, “As soon as I could get beyond the thought of self, came the determination to erect a memorial building to the memory of the good and true man, one that, while perpetuating his memory, would also do the greatest good for the greatest number.”

The first librarian, Mrs. L. L. Powell, served from the library’s inception until her passing in 1922.  She is commemorated by a bronze plaque in the children’s reading room.  Although the library has been open for over a century only seven librarians have served.

Over the years, few changes have been made to the red brick, Queen Anne structure.  The first floor houses the Adult Reading Room, the reference room, the Powell Children’s Reading Room, and the stack room, a 1962 addition to the building that houses more than fifty thousand volumes of information.

The Adult Reading Room houses artifacts including original chairs from The Cairo Custom House as well as an Italian marble mantle which dates back to the 1800s.

The second floor is home to the library’s auditorium which has a capacity of two hundred.  The auditorium is still used for recitals, receptions, plays, another events of community interest.  On display is a chandelier that once illuminated the now defunct Cairo Opera House as well as a desk kept at the Bank of the United States in Philadelphia by former president Andrew Jackson.

The library is still a fully functioning, lending books to members of the community on a daily basis.

“We’re always up to something,” said Monica Smith, the current librarian.  “We get a lot of tourists stopping in because of the amazing architecture.”

Recently the library was the recipient of a Libra Foundation grant which provided over 60 new children’s books.

“Our funding is limited so we can’t just go out and get new books all the time,” said Smith.

The Libra Foundation requires matching funds from the community which was provided by The Southern Foundation.

Cairo Headstart was the first group to enjoy some of the new titles on November 20. Librarian Marcha Davis was on hand to read some of the books to the captive audience of children.

The library is open Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Tonya Diel, of Cairo, looks through a book during her shelving duties at Cairo’s historic public library located at 1609 Washington Avenue. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Tonya Diel, of Cairo, looks through a book during her shelving duties at Cairo’s historic public library located at 1609 Washington Avenue. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

The Week in Photos: November 21, 2013

The visual report for the week of November 21, 2013:

Debbie Short prepares a hamburger at Tom's Place in Tamms.  THe restaurant reopened Friday after being closed since late September due to a truck crashing through the kitchen wall of the establishment.  "We're so happy to have people coming back in," said Bonnie Riston, owner of Tom's Place.  The reopening featured drawings for prizes and a catfish dinner. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Debbie Short prepares a hamburger at Tom’s Place in Tamms. The restaurant reopened Friday after being closed since late September due to a truck crashing through the kitchen wall of the establishment. “We’re so happy to have people coming back in,” said Bonnie Riston, owner of Tom’s Place. The reopening featured drawings for prizes and a catfish dinner. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Debbie Short takes a to-go order at Tom's Place in Tamms on Friday, November 15.  While customers passed through during the grand reopening on Friday take-out orders also kept the staff busy. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Debbie Short takes an order at Tom’s Place in Tamms on Friday, November 15. While customers passed through during the grand reopening on Friday take-out orders also kept the staff busy. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Linda Mallert and Ellen Braggen order their lunch at Tom's Place in Tamms on Friday, November 15. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Linda Mallert and Ellen Braggen order their lunch at Tom’s Place in Tamms on Friday, November 15. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Dessert items offered for sale sit on the counter at Tom's Place in Tamms.  The restaurant held a grand reopening on November 21. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Dessert items offered for sale sit on the counter at Tom’s Place in Tamms. The restaurant held a grand reopening on November 21. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Volunteers in Brookport, Ill. sift through debris at the site where the H & H Feed Store stood for 27 years -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Volunteers in Brookport, Ill. sift through debris at the site where the H & H Feed Store stood for 27 years — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Mark Harris fills a garbage bag with small debris as part of the cleanup effort in Brookport, Ill. on Monday.  Volunteers came out in large numbers to help clear streets and yards of trees and debris. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Mark Harris fills a garbage bag with small debris as part of the cleanup effort in Brookport, Ill. on Monday. Volunteers came out in large numbers to help clear streets and yards of trees and debris. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Ron Henson repairs siding damaged by the tornado in Brookport, Ill.  The house, occupied by his mother, suffered only minor damage. "We had a few broken windows and some torn off siding," said Henson.  "I think we got pretty lucky" -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Ron Henson repairs siding damaged by the tornado in Brookport, Ill. The house, occupied by his mother, suffered only minor damage. “We had a few broken windows and some torn off siding,” said Henson. “I think we got pretty lucky” — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Utility workers service the overhead lines on 4th street in Brookport, Ill. on Monday. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Utility workers service the overhead lines on 4th street in Brookport, Ill. on Monday. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Dalton Wright and Bailey Durapau survey the damage to their grandmother's home in Brookport, Ill. on Monday.  A tornado passed through the town Sunday afternoon damaging several local businesses and homes.  Governor Quinn declared Massac county a disaster area along with six others throughout the state. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Dalton Wright and Bailey Durapau survey the damage to their grandmother’s home in Brookport, Ill. on Monday. A tornado passed through the town Sunday afternoon damaging several local businesses and homes. Governor Quinn declared Massac county a disaster area along with six others throughout the state. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
A child's Barbie doll lays in the roadway on 4th Street in Brookport, Ill. on Monday, November 18, 2013.  The town was hit by a tornado on November 17, leaving parts of the town in ruin.  -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
A child’s Barbie doll lays in the roadway on 4th Street in Brookport, Ill. on Monday, November 18, 2013. The town was hit by a tornado on November 17, leaving parts of the town in ruin. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
The ruins of the H & H Feed Store in Boorkport, Ill. on Monday, November 18, 2013.  A tornado touched down in the area on the previous afternoon leaving a path of destruction through the town. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
The ruins of the H & H Feed Store in Boorkport, Ill. on Monday, November 18, 2013. A tornado touched down in the area on the previous afternoon leaving a path of destruction through the town. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Members of the Varsity and Junior-Varsity Cairo Pilots met to play an exhibition game against each other on Friday, November 17 at Cairo High School. The Blue and White game brought out members of the community excited at the prospects of the coming season.  -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Members of the Varsity and Junior-Varsity Cairo Pilots met to play an exhibition game against each other on Friday, November 17 at Cairo High School. The Blue and White game brought out members of the community excited at the prospects of the coming season. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Members of the Varsity and Junior-Varsity Cairo Pilots play one another at the annual Blue and White Game at Cairo High School on Friday November 17.  -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Members of the Varsity and Junior-Varsity Cairo Pilots play one another at the annual Blue and White Game at Cairo High School on Friday November 17. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citize
Ruby Smith passes out prizes to raffle winners at the Delta Activity Center in Cairo, Ill. on Thursday, November 14.  Members of the community met for a buffet lunch of chicken and to support the PATH program.  The Program for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness helps support those who are or are at risk for being homeless.  The program helps participants by aiding them in their search for jobs and providing services such as counseling and medical care. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Ruby Smith passes out prizes to raffle winners at the Delta Activity Center in Cairo, Ill. on Thursday, November 14. Members of the community met for a buffet lunch of chicken and to support the PATH program. The Program for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness helps support those who are or are at risk for being homeless. The program helps participants by aiding them in their search for jobs and providing services such as counseling and medical care. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Former NFL Player Tim Lester Speaks to Students

Tim Lester, former NFL fullback, spoke to students at Cairo High School Thursday warning of the dangers of drugs, alcohol, and poor decision making.

“You’re not born a winner; you’re not born a loser; you’re born a chooser,” said Lester.

Lester was raised in Miami with six siblings.  He was the first in his family to attend college on a football scholarship. After graduation Lester was drafted into the NFL by the Los Angeles Rams and played the following eight years.

Lester found that alcohol, sex, and drugs played a large role in the life of many of the athletes around him, causing him to stray from the very rules and values he was brought up on.

After a near-death experience Lester decided to devote his life to God.  This has inspired him to pen a book, tour the country speaking to students, and become an active  and family-oriented parent.

“I think the youth is confused sometimes by the messages around them,” said Lester.

With students filling the bleachers in the school’s gymnasium Lester recounted past experiences that influenced him and molded him into the person he is today.

“Sometimes life is going to be dark,” said Lester. “If you keep fighting though you’ll find the light.”

Lester informed the students of his rise through athletics which eventually led to him playing for The Dallas Cowboys, The Pittsburgh Steelers, and The Los Angeles Rams. Through the telling of his many adventures in the world of professional sports, Lester touched on the subjects of responsibility and respect.

Much of Lester’s presentatioin was accompanied by photos of him and his family throughout his life, all of which were projected onto a large screen in the middle of the gymnasium.

Students were asked to fill out cards on their own behalf stating that they would abstain from using drugs, violence, and other forms of inappropriate behavior.

The school also hosted a breakfast for several members of the community, including Mayor Coleman and Sheriff Tim Brown.  The breakfast meeting, held before Lester’s presentation to students, gave the member’s of the community an opportunity to discuss their faith and the measures needed to steer Cairo in the right direction.

Lester weighed in on  some of the issues the city deals with currently, stating that giving the population of growing children in the area positive activities and resources can make all the difference.

“Kids can’t get interested in stuff that they don’t feel is real,” said Lester.

Lester enquired about the positive activities that are available for the area youth.

Bob Nations, manager of the many speaking engagements Lester undertakes, was also on hand to speak about his faith and association with Southern Illinois.

Nations spoke of the history throughout the area, mentioning the many memories from his youth.

“I think Cairo can see another period of prosperity,” said Nations.

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Former NFL player Tim Lester addresses students in Cairo about the importance of making smart decisions.  Lester played for the Dallas Cowboys and the Pittsburgh Steelers over the course of his career.  "You're not born a winner; you're not born a loser; you're born a chooser," said Lester. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Former NFL player Tim Lester addresses students in Cairo about the importance of making smart decisions. Lester played for the Dallas Cowboys and the Pittsburgh Steelers over the course of his career. “You’re not born a winner; you’re not born a loser; you’re born a chooser,” said Lester. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

2012: The Year In Photos

This week we are taking a look at photographs that made the news in 2012.

Feature and Human Interest

Keyonte Anderson, 14, left, puts up a shot against Chris Anderson, 13, right, July 9 on 17th Street in Cairo. Keyonte said he and his friend were happy about the cooler temperatures because it means they will get to play more basketball. He said they were only able to get out and play 3 times while the temperatures were so hot. .– Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Mayor Tyrone Coleman, left, and Bishop Derek Eurales, right, listen to the eulogy delivered by Pastor Eddie Pierce for Ollie Lee during her funeral Aug. 11 at the First Missionary Baptist Church in Cairo. The church was packed with family and friends, all there to celebrate the life of Lee. With selected hymns sung by Larry Baldwin and the Oliver family as well as the general upbeat nature of the service, the event resembled more of a celebration than a somber funeral. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Emily Travis, right, of Belknap, and Clare Bunyan, cut up with fellow pageant girls Aug. 9 before taking the stage to compete in the second round of the Miss Southern Illinois Electric Co-op annual beauty pageant at Shawnee Community College. After both swimsuit and evening-wear competitions, the judges awarded Travis the crown.– Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Elijah Whitaker, 14 months, gets his first haircut Dec. 7 at Trinity Cutz in Mounds. Whitaker howled and cried as barber Macus Davis buzzed off his long hair.– Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Joe Woodson, middle, movies books through a crowded hallway just after the bell rings Aug. 15 at the Cairo Junior/Senior High School. Woodson said he has worked for the school for the last 17 years. He said he enjoys it because he likes working around people. Woodson has a good relationship with the students. He passes through the halls with a smile and a kind word to the kids. “I respect them, they respect me,” Woodson said.– Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Rodney Bell prepares to prime a 1976 Monte Carlo Nov. 21 in his garage in Ullin. Bell, who has been painting cars for the last 35 years, said he particularly enjoys working on mid century, American made cars for their originality and quality. “They had muscle and the cars lasted,” he said.– Isaac Smith | The Cairo citizen

Left to right, Tysi Posey- Howard, Victor Posey and Duane Posey perform gospel songs Oct. 6 during the Toll House Jam fundraiser at Fort Defiance Park in Cairo. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

From left to right, Harley Showalter, Sr., Harley Showalter Jr. and Frankie Temke, rush to get Showater Jr.’s car ready for the final heat during the Aug. 17 Pulaski County Fair demolition derby in Pulaski. Showalter Jr. is a third generation derbier. Despite his efforts, Showalter’s vehicle did not make it to the end of either heat he competed in. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Eddie Barfield, right, and his son Jayce Barfield, 12, both of Collinsville, leave the woods Nov. 17 near Unity. The two left the hunt because Jayce Barfield, who was on his first deer hunting trip, had gotten his fill of the cold. Eddie Barfield said he has been hunting those same woods for decades and enjoyed being out with his youngest son, pointing out different wildlife sounds. He said hunting is a good history lesson. “It gives better perspective on how men used to live,” Eddie Barfield said. November 16 marked the opening of shotgun season for deer in Ill. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Nathan Kaufman, 7, right, and his brother Caleb, 11, both of Buncombe sell a dead raccoon Dec. 12 at McClellan Fur Company in Pulaski. This trapping season is the second Nathan and Caleb have participated in. Their father, Jay Kaufman, said whatever money the family gets from selling pelts, the boys split down the middle. For two days of trapping, the brothers each were paid $43. Stanley McClellan, owner of the Fur Company, said hunting and trapping is traditionally a family activity. He often has families come in to sell furs. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Nathan Kaufman, 7, right, and his brother Caleb, 11, both of Buncombe sell a dead raccoon Dec. 12 at McClellan Fur Company in Pulaski. This trapping season is the second Nathan and Caleb have participated in. Their father, Jay Kaufman, said whatever money the family gets from selling pelts, the boys split down the middle. For two days of trapping, the brothers each were paid $43. Stanley McClellan, owner of the Fur Company, said hunting and trapping is traditionally a family activity. He often has families come in to sell furs. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Gus Colbroth, of mounds, takes a cigarette break Dec. 12 while working for Spring Valley Farms in Pulaski. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Nina Ellis, right, is congratulated by friends and family Nov. 24 after winning the Unheard Gospel Voices competition held in Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church in Cairo. “I haven’t ever won anything before in my life,” Ellis said after she was awarded the $1,000 cash prize. Ellis, 34, said she grew up singing and was unsure about her abilities going into the contest. Normally not an outgoing person, Ellis said she was drawn out by her friend, and competition organizer Yolanda Wilkins The event, lasted for nearly 60 days and drew talent from around the local area. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Nina Ellis, right, is congratulated by friends and family Nov. 24 after winning the Unheard Gospel Voices competition held in Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church in Cairo. “I haven’t ever won anything before in my life,” Ellis said after she was awarded the $1,000 cash prize. Ellis, 34, said she grew up singing and was unsure about her abilities going into the contest. Normally not an outgoing person, Ellis said she was drawn out by her friend, and competition organizer Yolanda Wilkins The event, lasted for nearly 60 days and drew talent from around the local area. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

News

Kenneth Taake inspects an ear of corn from one of his farm fields July 13 near his home in Ullin. Taake said he thought only 25-30% of his corn crop would yield and that he would have to file a claim with his crop insurance. Taake said because of the triple digit temperatures, the corn was stressed during pollination and were only 10-20% developed. Taake said he was still hopeful for his soybean crop, however. -- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Kenneth Taake inspects an ear of corn from one of his farm fields July 13 near his home in Ullin. Taake said he thought only 25-30% of his corn crop would yield and that he would have to file a claim with his crop insurance. Taake said because of the triple digit temperatures, the corn was stressed during pollination and were only 10-20% developed. Taake said he was still hopeful for his soybean crop, however. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Marty Nicholson, left, gives instructions to a line of Cairo residents waiting to get water behind city hall Oct. 14 after the city lost water service. The evening of Oct. 13 Illinois American Water noticed a drop in water pressure in Cairo and asked residents to conserve water and by the 14th, the city had lost water pressure almost entirely. -- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Marty Nicholson, left, gives instructions to a line of Cairo residents waiting to get water behind city hall Oct. 14 after the city lost water service. The evening of Oct. 13 Illinois American Water noticed a drop in water pressure in Cairo and asked residents to conserve water and by the 14th, the city had lost water pressure almost entirely. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Allen Cruthird, right, follows Cairo fire chief John Meyer into a burned building Oct. 29 on the corner of Poplar and 32 St. in Cairo. Meyer said the fire, which started the night before, continued to smolder because the roof collapsed, leaving several layers of shingles between the fire itself and the water being used to put it out. After an investigation by the state fire marshal’s office, the cause of the fire was determined to be arson. -- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Allen Cruthird, right, follows Cairo fire chief John Meyer into a burned building Oct. 29 on the corner of Poplar and 32 St. in Cairo. Meyer said the fire, which started the night before, continued to smolder because the roof collapsed, leaving several layers of shingles between the fire itself and the water being used to put it out. After an investigation by the state fire marshal’s office, the cause of the fire was determined to be arson. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Jabarrie Rice, son of Tim Rice, who was murdered Nov. 10, plays with a balloon Nov. 12 from his father’s memorial service in McBride Place. Rice’s mother, Jeannifer Giden, said her son is too young to fully grasp what happened to his father. As of press time, the case was still under investigation -- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Jabarrie Rice, son of Tim Rice, who was murdered Nov. 10, plays with a balloon Nov. 12 from his father’s memorial service in McBride Place. Rice’s mother, Jeannifer Giden, said her son is too young to fully grasp what happened to his father. As of press time, the case was still under investigation — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Jesse Russell, left, of America, Leonard Johnson, center, of Mounds City, and Artie Dickerson of Mounds City, wait for election results Nov. 6 at the Pulaski County Courthouse in Mounds City. Russell wandered around the courthouse for hours waiting to see if his dad, Monte Russell, would be reelected as County Commissioner. When the votes were tallied, Monte Russell won with 1,668 votes cast in his favor. – Lynnette Oostmeyer | The Cairo Citizen
Jesse Russell, left, of America, Leonard Johnson, center, of Mounds City, and Artie Dickerson of Mounds City, wait for election results Nov. 6 at the Pulaski County Courthouse in Mounds City. Russell wandered around the courthouse for hours waiting to see if his dad, Monte Russell, would be reelected as County Commissioner. When the votes were tallied, Monte Russell won with 1,668 votes cast in his favor. – Lynnette Oostmeyer | The Cairo Citizen

William "Buchie" Bingham waits to be sworn in for the second time as Alexander County Coroner Dec. 3 at the Alexander County Courthouse in Cairo.-- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
William “Buchie” Bingham waits to be sworn in for the second time as Alexander County Coroner Dec. 3 at the Alexander County Courthouse in Cairo.– Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Lawanda Harris, right, owner of G &L Shoe Emporium, rings up her first customer, Mayor Tyrone Coleman, Aug. 31 during the store’s grand opening in Cairo. Coleman said he spotted a tie, which came in a color he had been searching for, for months. Coleman said it is great that the citizens of Cairo will not have to always travel out of town to buy clothes or shoes. “It’s a good day,” Coleman said. “We don’t have businesses opening too often.” – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Lawanda Harris, right, owner of G &L Shoe Emporium, rings up her first customer, Mayor Tyrone Coleman, Aug. 31 during the store’s grand opening in Cairo. Coleman said he spotted a tie, which came in a color he had been searching for, for months. Coleman said it is great that the citizens of Cairo will not have to always travel out of town to buy clothes or shoes. “It’s a good day,” Coleman said. “We don’t have businesses opening too often.” – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Jackie Jones, right, gets help shampooing her first customer from Kylie Graham, left Oct. 31 on after Jones’ grand opening for her beauty salon, Razor Sharp. Jones said she has wanted to cut hair since she was young when she remembers going to her mother’s beauty shop. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Jackie Jones, right, gets help shampooing her first customer from Kylie Graham, left Oct. 31 on after Jones’ grand opening for her beauty salon, Razor Sharp. Jones said she has wanted to cut hair since she was young when she remembers going to her mother’s beauty shop. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Davis Flood, left and Darren Nauce work to put up doors Dec. 3 outside the old Piggly Wiggly in Cairo. The shopping center will soon be transformed into a Subway, Chester’s Chicken and Blue Fish General Store which could bring as many as 25 jobs to the city. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Davis Flood, left and Darren Nauce work to put up doors Dec. 3 outside the old Piggly Wiggly in Cairo. The shopping center will soon be transformed into a Subway, Chester’s Chicken and Blue Fish General Store which could bring as many as 25 jobs to the city. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Sherry Windings, president of the Ladies Auxiliary for the American Legion in Villa Ridge, places a holiday wreath on her husbands grave Dec. 15 at the Mound City National Cemetery after the annual Wreaths Across America service. Windings also brought a wreath for her brother, who died nearly a year after her husband in 2011. She said she feels the ceremony is important for honoring those who have served in the military. “I think they need to be honored in this kind of way,” Windings said. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Sherry Windings, president of the Ladies Auxiliary for the American Legion in Villa Ridge, places a holiday wreath on her husbands grave Dec. 15 at the Mound City National Cemetery after the annual Wreaths Across America service. Windings also brought a wreath for her brother, who died nearly a year after her husband in 2011. She said she feels the ceremony is important for honoring those who have served in the military. “I think they need to be honored in this kind of way,” Windings said. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Sports

Brian Brandtner watches the junior high school basketball team run sprints during practice Sept. 24 in the Cairo Junior / Senior High School gymnasium. Brandtner was hired as the new Cairo High School basketball Coach during the Cairo School Board meeting Sept. 20. Though he stepped down as the junior high coach, he stayed on until the board hired Bernard Brown to replace him as coach for the team. -- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Brian Brandtner watches the junior high school basketball team run sprints during practice Sept. 24 in the Cairo Junior / Senior High School gymnasium. Brandtner was hired as the new Cairo High School basketball Coach during the Cairo School Board meeting Sept. 20. Though he stepped down as the junior high coach, he stayed on until the board hired Bernard Brown to replace him as coach for the team. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Daneesha Carthell drives past Meridian’s defense Dec. 17 during the Egyptian home loss against the Meridian Lady Bobkits. The varsity  Lady Falcons  fell to the Bobkits with a final score of 39-10. -- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Daneesha Carthell drives past Meridian’s defense Dec. 17 during the Egyptian home loss against the Meridian Lady Bobkits. The varsity Lady Falcons fell to the Bobkits with a final score of 39-10. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Allen Cruthird, left, and assistant coach Brian Brantner, right help Jahmei Salley gear up to take the plate Aug. 22 during the Junior Pilots' game against the Jonesboro Bulldogs.-- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Allen Cruthird, left, and assistant coach Brian Brantner, right help Jahmei Salley gear up to take the plate Aug. 22 during the Junior Pilots’ game against the Jonesboro Bulldogs.– Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Meridian Bobkits head coach Robert Andrews, left, give a pep talk at halftime Nov. 9 during the 8th grade away game against the Anna Indians. The team secured a win over the Indians with a final score of 40-38. -- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Meridian Bobkits head coach Robert Andrews, left, give a pep talk at halftime Nov. 9 during the 8th grade away game against the Anna Indians. The team secured a win over the Indians with a final score of 40-38. — Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Sophomore Koree Simelton prepares to serve during the Pilot’s Sept. 17 away game against the Trinity Falcons at the old Carbondale High School. Simelton said she is very excited about volleyball now being offered at the high school level. She said she has always wanted to play.-- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Sophomore Koree Simelton prepares to serve during the Pilot’s Sept. 17 away game against the Trinity Falcons at the old Carbondale High School. Simelton said she is very excited about volleyball now being offered at the high school level. She said she has always wanted to play.– Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

 Kim Harris, left, talks with her husband Todd Harris, after his team lost the first finals round during the Cache River Days softball tournament Sept. 9 in Ullin.-- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Kim Harris, left, talks with her husband Todd Harris, after his team lost the first finals round during the Cache River Days softball tournament Sept. 9 in Ullin.– Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Chris Nelson, 7th grade, left, protects the ball during the Junior Pilots’ Nov. 1 win against the Jonesboro Bulldogs. The final score of the game was 47-19. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Chris Nelson, 7th grade, left, protects the ball during the Junior Pilots’ Nov. 1 win against the Jonesboro Bulldogs. The final score of the game was 47-19. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Meridian junior baseball assistant coach Curtland Sawyer, left, and Seth Sharp, wait in the dugout before their game against the Dongola Demons Aug. 31.-- Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen
Meridian junior baseball assistant coach Curtland Sawyer, left, and Seth Sharp, wait in the dugout before their game against the Dongola Demons Aug. 31.– Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

 

Breaking in banding supplies

Debbie Walter saw more customers the day before Thanksgiving than she had anticipated.

Debbie Walter, middle, goes through the contents a cow banding kit with Randy Mead (not shown), Nov. 21 at Phoenix Mills in Ullin. Mead said before this year he had been castrating his bulls with a scalpel, however now because of their size he said it is safer to use the banding method. – Isaac Smith | The Cairo Citizen

Rotary donates dictionaries to Cairo class

The Cairo Rotary Club provided student dictionaries to both third grade classes at Cairo Elementary school. Students and teachers were thrilled to receive the dictionaries from the club.
Members of the club presented the dictionaries to the students and their teachers on Sept. 10th. This project is in support of Rotary International’s focus on basic education and literacy.
The Cairo Rotary Club is excited about supporting literacy initiatives and volunteering to serve the community of Cairo and surrounding areas. Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders united worldwide who provide humanitarian service and help to build goodwill and peace in the world. There are approximately 1.2 million Rotarians who are members of more than 30,000 Rotary clubs in over 163 countries.