Votes Trickle in for 2014 Illinois Primary Election

Primary elections were held across the state of Illinois on Tuesday, March 18.  The election gave voters the chance to influence who will represent them at the state and local levels.

Early  and absentee voting began in late-February and March for Alexander and Pulaski Counties and was wrapped up over the weekend. Alexander  County Clerk and Election Authority Frances Lee opened her office on Saturday to accomodate the last of early voting in the county.

Af 11:00 a.m. on Saturday only five voters had come through the office.  The low numbers correlated with state-wide predictions of a low voter turnout.

“It’s been very quiet so far this election,” said Lee. “I think a lot of people have stopped caring.  John Q. Public is sick of the back-and-forth fighting between the different sides.”

Lee also cited the small amount of campaign advertising in the area as a factor in the low turnout.

“Usually there are signs and advertisements everywhere,” said Lee.  “That’s how people know that there’s an election approaching.  There isn’t much of that around this year.”

Monday afternoon saw the distribution of election equipment.  Election judges for the county picked up their precinct’s ballots and M100 voting systems.  The judges are responsible for the delivery as well as the return of the equipment after the election.

As the voting machines began leaving the County Clerk’s office late Monday afternoon, workers and election judges milled about and conversed with eachother.

“I’m starting to get all nerved up,” said Ellen Henderson-Bigham, a candidate for Alexander County Clerk.

The most closely watched race in this year’s primary election is that for representation in the election for Governor of Illinois.

With five candidates on the ballot in Alexander County, three being Republican, the possibility for change throughout the state is a possibility.

Election judge Vernon Stubblefield had only nine voters come through his precinct at the Alexander County Courthouse by 2 p.m. The slow trickle of voters left judges time to converse and offer ther opinions on the primary election.

“You would think that because of the number of Republican candidates on the ballot there would be more people from the party out voting,” said Vernon.

The Cairo Airport had only 14 voters come through the precinct by 2:30 in the afternoon.

“Some people would sure help the time go by quicker,” said Curtis Jones, and election judge at the Cache precinct.

As polling wound down, workers in the Alexander County Clerk’s office began counting and processing absentee ballots.  The process involves comparing records and signatures on previously submitted documents to weed out anyone attempting to vote more than once. Approximately 165 absentee and early ballots were processed and then added to the final tally by the County Clerk’s staff.

By 8:30 p.m. ten of the eleven precincts had reported back with a total eligible turnout of 14.5 percent.  Thebes, which struggled with tabulation issues,  reported at 9:05 p.m.

A closely watched aspect of the election was the race for Illinois Senate representation. Senator Durbin was opposed by Republicans Jim Oberweis and Doug Traux.  Strong opposition to Democrats has been major local news in recent months.

Senator Durbin ran unopposed on the Democratic ticket for position of senator and  garnered a majority of votes in Alexander  and Pulaski Counties.

Oberweis was victorious on the Republican side of the Senate race with 64 percent of the vote in Alexander County.

Tio Hardiman upset Pat Quinn for nomination to represent the Democratic Party for Illinois Governor in both Alexander and Pulaski Counties.

The complete tabulation revealed that 19.36 percent of eligible voters in Alexander County voted, just shy of the predicted 20 percent. In Pulaski County 18.64 percent of eligible voters took a trip to the polls.

1,082 total votes were cast in Alexander County and 864 in Pulaski County.

(See below for a full breakdown of votes)
Alexander County Treasurer Jerry Smith posts election results outside County Clerk's office in the Alexander County Courthouse Tuesday evening. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Alexander County Treasurer Jerry Smith posts election results outside County Clerk’s office in the Alexander County Courthouse Tuesday evening. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Cuirtis Jones, an election judge at Alexander County’s Cache precinct, housed at the Cairo Airport, laments to a friend about the low number of voters he has seen. Jones’ precinct had only 14 voters by early Monday afternoon. “The clock just isn’t moving,” Jones said. Low turnout was expected throughout the region with some speculating only 20 percent of eligible voters taking advantage of the opportunity to influence change in the forthcoming state elections. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Cuirtis Jones, an election judge at Alexander County’s Cache precinct, housed at the Cairo Airport, laments to a friend about the low number of voters he has seen. Jones’ precinct had only 14 voters by early Monday afternoon.
“The clock just isn’t moving,” Jones said.
Low turnout was expected throughout the region with some speculating only 20 percent of eligible voters taking advantage of the opportunity to influence change in the forthcoming state elections. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Among the stacks of ballots and voting equipment, Alexander County Clerk Frances Lee works in the back of her office with Wytiona Orr on Monday to prepare the precincts throughout Alexander County for the March 18 primary election.  “I’m going to miss doing this,” said Lee. “It can be fun if you enjoy working with people.” Low voter turnout was experienced throughout Illinois.  Alexander and Pulaski Counties were no exception with many speculating that only around twenty percent of all eligible voters would participate. “People don’t really seem to care until it’s the main election,” said Lee. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Among the stacks of ballots and voting equipment, Alexander County Clerk Frances Lee works in the back of her office with Wytiona Orr on Monday to prepare the precincts throughout Alexander County for the March 18 primary election.
“I’m going to miss doing this,” said Lee. “It can be fun if you enjoy working with people.”
Low voter turnout was experienced throughout Illinois. Alexander and Pulaski Counties were no exception with many speculating that only around twenty percent of all eligible voters would participate.
“People don’t really seem to care until it’s the main election,” said Lee. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Pulaski County Unofficial Results
Pulaski County Unofficial Results
Alexander County Unofficial Results
Alexander County Unofficial Results

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

 

 

Ash Wednesday Ushers in Lent

The beginning of Lent was marked by Ash Wednesday this week.  People throughout the country attended extra church services and received blessings as well as the ceremonious application of ashes to the forehead.

The ashes serve as a reminder of human mortality and as a sign of repentance.  The ashes are usually derived from the burning of palms from the previous year’s Palm Sunday.

A topic on the mind of many at this year’s Ash Wednesday was the shrinking number  of places for worship.  With congregations throughout the state consolidating due to closing parishes, many in the region attended the Ash Wednesday mass held at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Cairo.

Mary Caballero, a member a new member of the St. Patrick’s congregation stated that although the changes of venue have caused some difficulties, things are proceeding in a normal manner.

“Everybody’s ready for a new beginning,” said Cabellero.  “We’ve all been getting to know some new faces and it’s been a positive experience for the most part.”

Friar M.C. Mujule led the year’s Ash Wednesday mass and spoke of the changing of seasons as well as the journey that the season of Lent signifies.

“We devote ourselves during Lent as a way to experience what Christ went through,” said Mujule. “We do this through prayer, fasting, and arms giving.”

Mujule highlighted the importance of caring for others throughout the season and reminded those present of suggested canned and other food items which can often be important in a time of need. Nonperishables and canned meats and vegetables are always accepted at St. Patrick’s in Cairo.

Sunday mass for Alexander and Pulaski County Catholics takes place weekly at 11:00 a.m. in Cairo.

 

The Congregation at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Cairo gathered last week to begin the season of Lent on Ash Wednesday. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
The Congregation at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Cairo gathered last week to begin the season of Lent on Ash Wednesday. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Area Districts Cope With Missed School Days

Harsh winter conditions have forced schools in Alexander and Pulaski Counties to close for multiple days this year.  While snow days are generally allotted to each school, persistent extreme weather has caused many districts to surpass their original rations.

Currently, the Cairo School District has missed 11 days of school due to severe weather. The District quickly surpassed the five allotted days however, have been granted forgiveness by the State of Illinois for four of the days so far.

Superintendant Angie Evers explained that because Illinois as a whole has experience a rough winter, Act of God days, which are applied for by the district as a means of forgiveness, are being approved more liberally than usual.

“I’m quite certain that we’ll be granted the other days which are pending at this time,” said Evers. “We were scheduled to have Monday off for Casmir Pulaski so that didn’t effect us.”

The biggest concern for the school is the effects on I-SAT testing that is scheduled to begin this week.  With the week before the tests shortened, preparation and scheduled curriculum are being squeezed into fewer hours.

“It’s a delicate balancing act,” said Evers.  “I desperately want children in the classrooms but you have to consider keeping people safe when they’re trying to get to school. Mother Nature has really been working against us.”

At this time the last day of school for the district is planned for June 4.

“We’ve got our fingers crossed,” said Evers.

Pulaski County schools are in much of the same situation.  Weather caused closures throughout the week for Meridian schools.

Elementary principal Brent Boren stated that at time of printing the district has been out of school 18 days due to winter weather.

“We’ve lost almost a full month of school,” said Boren.  “It’s been detrimental in respect to the time we’ve had to prepare for state testing.”

Boren also spoke of the toll missed school days take on student’s retention and comprehension.

“When children miss school it takes them out of the rhythm of education and can often break any momentum they have going for them,” said Boren.

A major factor in determining whether schools remain in service are the road conditions.  Administration agreed that  student’s safety is the number one priority when it comes to deciding whether school will close.

“It’s most important to keep the children safe,” said Boren

Temperatures have began to rise across the region, giving many hope that the end of the brutal winter Illinois has experienced is in sight.

“We’re just going to keep plugging along and sooner or later it’s going to improve,” said Boren.

Alicia Rames and Erica McDowell enjoy playing in the snow in Cairo on Thursday. Severe weather in the area has prompted districts to apply for pardons from the state of Illinois. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Alicia Rames and Erica McDowell enjoy playing in the snow in Cairo on Thursday. Severe weather in the area has prompted districts to apply for pardons from the state of Illinois. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Cairo Booster Society Aims to Make Changes in Town

The newly established Cairo Booster Society is making the positive change they want to see in the area.  Through recent beautification projects around Cairo and organization of meetings and events, the group aims to make Cairo a more enjoyable place to reside.

The Booster Society recently inducted 14 students from the 6th grade 4-H class at Cairo Junior High in an effort to spark interest among the younger population of the area.  These students will help with the ongoing projects planned.

President Tim Means stated that the first project planned for the City of Cairo is the rebuilding of a gazebo at the entrance of Halliday Park.

“It’s been a little cold lately so we’re really just waiting on the weather to break before we get rolling,” said Means.

The next meeting of the Cairo Booster Society is planned for 6 PM on March 13 at City Hall in Cairo.  All are welcome and encouraged to attend with ideas on ways Cairo can be improved.

 George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Severe Weather Strikes Alexander County

On March 2 National Severe Weather Week kicked off throughout the country. The last week brought heavy precipitation to the lower half of Illinois which coincides with America’s acknowledgement of the forces of nature.

The week highlights the importance of being prepared during natural disasters such as tornados, floods, thunderstorms, and lightning.

Sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the week is used to inform people of the precautions they can take to remain safe and comfortable when severe weather strikes.  A heavy emphasis is placed on being prepared for the unexpected and ensuring the proper necessities to survivie are on hand.

FEMA recommends organizing a basic disaster supply kit including provisions that may not be readily available during a time of crisis.  Some suggested items to include are batteries, a three-day supply of non-perishable food and water, a first-aid kit, and a battery-powered or hand-crank radio.

The importance of having an emergency plan in place is also stressed as part of National Severe Weather Week. Because communication can often be difficult after or during severe weather it is important for all members of a family to know exactly know how to get to a safe location. Knowing the emergency plans for your family’s schools and workplaces is an important asset.

As the months progress many forget about the possibility of snow and ice storms.  Although many see March as the beginning of spring weather, substantial winter precipitation has been recorded into the month of April.

Also, when temperatures do rise, the thaw that ensues brings the risk of flooding throughout the Ohio River Valley and Southern Illinois.  Flooding has been a major concern for Cairo in the past, most memorably in 2011 when severe flooding prompted the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers to dynamite a section of levee to subside flooding.

One problem that is experienced by drivers throughout the region is road degredation. The fluxtuation of temperatures causes roads to shrink and swell, opening potholes capable of ruining rims and tires.

Alexander County Highway Engineer Jeff Denny deals with the ever evolving status of the roads throughout the county on a daily basis.

Through the use of salt and cinders the county has dealt with the winter road issues on a tight budget.

“We’ve had to use our resources sparingly but , we’re going to make it,” said Denny.

When asked about pothole issues throughout the area Denny stated that problems have been more prevalent than usual however, are being dealt with on a daily basis.

Southern Illinois saw severe winter weather touch the region over the weekend, prompting many to retrieve shovels and ice scrapers which were hoped to be forgotten until the next winter. Although precipitation was heavy rising temperatures cause much of the standing snow to quickly melt and turn to standing ground water.

Crews throughout Alexander and Pulaski Counties worked Monday and Tuesday to make roads passable for area residents.

 George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Cairo Looks to Humane Society for Help With Strays

Members of the community met on Thursday at City Hall in Cairo to discuss possible avenues of dealing with the prevalent stray dog problem in the city.  The issue has been a source of debate for several months on exactly how to handle the problem as well as whether the responsibility falls on Alexander County or the City of Cairo.

Cairo Mayor Tyrone Coleman made the city council aware that he has been meeting with The Humane Society in Cape Girardeau in regards to finding an affordable way to curb the animal control issue. Coleman stated at a recent city council meeting that the possibility of having a year’s worth of the needed resources paid for by The Humane Society.

At a meeting between Police Chief Snelson, Coleman, and a group of  concerned area residents, a list of needed actions to prepare the city for a new animal control program were presented by Lorrie Hesselrode. The list included repairs to the existing kennels, getting the water turned on at the pens, and a thorough cleaning.

The responsibilities and scheduling of of a prospective were also discussed at length.

“This is something that actually needs to be a full-time position but we just don’t have the money to support it,” said Hesselrode.

The importance of keeping expenses at a minimum was stressed throughout the meeting.  The possibility of starting an animal control network with Tamms is an idea considered by Coleman.

An agreement between the City of Cairo, Illinois, Municipal Corporation and The Humane Society of Southeast Missouri lays out the framework for a program that will house domestic animals picked up by the City Health Officer and assistants.

The agreement states that the Society will house picked up animals for a five-day holding period as required by the State of Missouri.  After the five days have passed, the animals will become the property and responsibility of the state.  If the animals are observed to be suffering from illness or injury beyond recovery at the time of impoundment they will be released to the Society to be humanely euthanized.

Another stipulation of the agreement is that at least one pen will be set aside for suspected rabid animals. Animals suspected of carrying rabies will be held for ten days, as required by law.  If the animal is too vicious to house for the ten days it will be euthanized and sent off for rabies testing.

The term of the agreement will be for one year, running from March 1, 2014 to February 28, 2015.  Cairo will pay the Society a fee of $2,500.00 in advance for the duration of the contract.

Coleman stated that he has also been in touch with individuals from the community who are willing to devote their time and resources to remedy the problem. Citizens in the area have already begun transporting strays to animal shelters on their own.

“It’s a serious matter for the community and a safety issue as well,” said Coleman. “There’s volunteers out there that want to help but including them is a very involved process.”

The city is now accepting applications for individuals who would like to volunteer their time and abilities to the new animal control program.

Alexander County Sheriff Timothy Brown had debated Mayor Coleman in the past on whether it is the county’s responsibility to handle animal control. When asked about the new program Brown remained optimistic.

“It sounds like it could be a pretty good deal,” said Brown.

Linda Swoboda has converted her personal car into an animal transportation vehicle as a means of helping the area combat the stray animal population. The act of volunteering her skills to help animals came as second nature for Swoboda

Using an app on her smart phone, Swoboda coordinates rides for animals between shelters in Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri.

“I can sign up to transport an animal in just a few seconds if I’m available or if it’s convienent for me to help,” said Swoboda.

The use of volunteers is an exciting prospect for Cairo which would keep costs low, however, the qualifications for volunteers will need to be established and reviewed.

“If I can say one thing to the residents of the area it is to be patient,” said Mayor Coleman. “We’re working towards a positive resolution but these things take time.”

Alexander County Sheriff and Cairo resident Tim Brown debates the issue of animal control with Mayor Tyrone Coleman at a community breakfast held at Cairo High School in October 2013 -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Alexander County Sheriff and Cairo resident Tim Brown debates the issue of animal control with Mayor Tyrone Coleman at a community breakfast held at Cairo High School in October 2013 — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

The Week in Photos: February 27, 2014

The Visual Report for the Week of February 27, 2014:

The Villa Ridge American Legion offered a fish dinner for residents of the area on Saturday evening.  Approximately 175 pounds of fish was prepared and fried, feeding numerous family and friends of American Legion members. The Legion’s kitchen and cooking trailer were occupied with a flurry of activity throughout the afternoon.  Members and volunteers took turns manning the cooking stations and running food from the outside fryers to the kitchen to be served.  While children played throughout the Legion’s yard, older members of the organization were given the chance to dine together, socialize, and catch up on the winter’s happenings. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
The Villa Ridge American Legion offered a fish dinner for residents of the area on Saturday evening. Approximately 175 pounds of fish was prepared and fried, feeding numerous family and friends of American Legion members.
The Legion’s kitchen and cooking trailer were occupied with a flurry of activity throughout the afternoon. Members and volunteers took turns manning the cooking stations and running food from the outside fryers to the kitchen to be served. While children played throughout the Legion’s yard, older members of the organization were given the chance to dine together, socialize, and catch up on the winter’s happenings. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Billy Coleman repairs a headlight on his truck in Cairo on Saturday. Coleman made the repairs in preparation for a road trip and enjoyed the company of his son and passing cats.  “At least it’s not so horribly cold out today,” said Coleman. With temperatures rising into the low 50s, many throughout the area took the opportunity to get out of their homes and accomplish some long delayed chores.  The warm up comes after several weeks of frigid weather for the state of Illinois. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Billy Coleman repairs a headlight on his truck in Cairo on Saturday. Coleman made the repairs in preparation for a road trip and enjoyed the company of his son and passing cats.
“At least it’s not so horribly cold out today,” said Coleman.
With temperatures rising into the low 50s, many throughout the area took the opportunity to get out of their homes and accomplish some long delayed chores. The warm up comes after several weeks of frigid weather for the state of Illinois. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
CPU workers began the task of converting old bricks possessed by the city into a fine mix.  The recycled mix will be used around town to fill holes and cracks in the roadway. “This operation is going to benefit the city in a very cost effective and positive manner,” said Mayor Tyrone Coleman. The bricks that have occupied lots on the Southeast end of Cairo are being grinded using industrial machinery rented with money Cairo’s demolition fund.  The process is expected to leave the city of Cairo in possession of over 10 tons of usable fill. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
CPU workers began the task of converting old bricks possessed by the city into a fine mix. The recycled mix will be used around town to fill holes and cracks in the roadway.
“This operation is going to benefit the city in a very cost effective and positive manner,” said Mayor Tyrone Coleman.
The bricks that have occupied lots on the Southeast end of Cairo are being grinded using industrial machinery rented with money Cairo’s demolition fund. The process is expected to leave the city of Cairo in possession of over 10 tons of usable fill. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Scott Henderson and Link Warren take a break from their work of repairing the upper windows of The Custom House in Cairo on Friday. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Scott Henderson and Link Warren take a break from their work of repairing the upper windows of The Custom House in Cairo on Friday. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
The Cairo Pilots battled Lovejoy Saturday as part of the High School’s Homecoming festivities. The Junior Varsity Pilots were victorious over Lovejoy with a score of 57 -50. The Pilots controlled the ball for a majority of the game, remaining in the lead throughout play.-- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
The Cairo Pilots battled Lovejoy Saturday as part of the High School’s Homecoming festivities. The Junior Varsity Pilots were victorious over Lovejoy with a score of 57 -50. The Pilots controlled the ball for a majority of the game, remaining in the lead throughout play.– George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Cairo High School crowned their homecoming royalty on Saturday.  Jarvis Woodson and Alexis Murray were selected by the student body as the 2014 homecoming king and queen.  The school held a dance after the Homecoming basketball game against Lovejoy. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Cairo High School crowned their homecoming royalty on Saturday. Jarvis Woodson and Alexis Murray were selected by the student body as the 2014 homecoming king and queen. The school held a dance after the Homecoming basketball game against Lovejoy. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

 

 

 

 

 

Alexander County Board Meeting: February 25, 2014

The Alexander County Board of commisioners met at the Alexander County Courthouse on Tuesday afternoon fo a regularly scheduled meeting.

The Board approved the minutes from the February 11 meeting.

County Clerk Frances Lee reminded those present of the upcoming primary election ans stated that her office would be open to service early voters on Monday, March 3. Regular voting will take place throughout Alexander County on Tuesday, March 18.

Alexander County Highway Engineer Jeff Denny informed members of the Board that his department had began accepting bids from contractors on the demolition of the old Burkhart building in Cairo.  Denny also gave an update about the ongoing status of flood buyouts throughout county. Denny stated that the process is moving forward, with approximately 70 assessments completed at this time.

Payroll , recurring, and Highway Department bills were approved to be paid for .

Chairman Harold McNelly chose to appoint Lorrie Hesselrode and Danny Brown to the Southern 7 Health Department.

Chalen Tatem made the Board aware of a $1,032.00 credit that he is in the process of acquiring from the county’s telephone service provider.

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Pyramid Chess Club Teaches Members New Moves

The Pyramid Chess Club, a gathering of students interested in the game of chess, has become a positive resource for all who are involved.

The club allows students who are involved the chance to progress their chess-playing abilities as well as socialize with peers who share the same interests and love of the game.

Members of The Pyramid Chess Club plan to attend the upcoming 6th Annual Metro Saint Louis Class Championship held on February 22 at the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis.

The annual tournament pits students of the same age groups against eachother over the course of three rounds.

Chess philosopher and editor of “The Chess Club Chronicles” newsletter Zayn Hollis describes playing chess as “seeing tactical patterns as a sphere rotating through the time-space continuum.”

While chess is seen merely as a game to some, others find the strategy and foresight utilized throughout the game as an ever evolving and progressing war between two opponents. Opponents command tiny armies and mount attacks, hoping to capture the other side’s king and queen.

“To me, chess is like a passport to wealthy living,” said Hollis.  I think of all the great minds and how they live and what they have done.”

The Pyramid Chess Club meets regularly throughout the school year and encourages those interested to check out what is offered.

Member’s of the Pyramid Chess Club pose for a photo with Mayor of Cairo Tyrone Coleman.  The club offers members the opportunity to progress their chess skills while playing with peers who share interest in the game. -- Photo Provided | The Cairo Citizen
Member’s of the Pyramid Chess Club pose for a photo with Mayor of Cairo Tyrone Coleman. The club offers members the opportunity to progress their chess skills while playing with peers who share interest in the game. — Photo Provided | The Cairo Citizen

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Chauncey Hughes Appears in Alexander County Court

Chauncey Hughes appeared before a judge in the Alexander County Courthouse on Tuesday, February 18.  Hughes, who has been in custody at the Tri-County Detention Center in Ullin since turning himself in State Police, faced multiple charges, some dating back to2012.

Hughes faced multiple charges of Aggravated Battery stemming from an altercation in the parking lot of Dollar General in Cairo as well as Possesion of more than  2.5 grams of Cannabis.

These charges add to the five counts of first-degree murder Hughes is facing in the death of his  wife Heather Davis.

Davis was found unresponsive  in her residence by the Cairo Police Department on the evening of November 1, 2013.  After being transported to St. Francis Hospital in  Missouri Davis was pronounced dead.

Hughes turned himself in to State Police District 22 Headquarters shortly after being named as a primary suspect by authorities.

At the hearing on Tuesday Hughes’ lawyer asked the judge to reschedule the jury trial for April, citing the need for more time to review evidence in the case  It was estimated that the defense need three more days to review taped interviews.

Hughes stated in court that he had no objection to the rescheduling of his trial.

The new date for the  jury trial has been set for April 29 at 10 AM in the Alexander County Courthouse. The pretrial is scheduled for April 1.

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Defendant Chauncey Hughes is shown in a recent mugshot.   Hughes trial has been moved to April 29 with the pretrial taking place on April 1. -- Photo Provided | The Cairo Citizen
Defendant Chauncey Hughes is shown in a recent mugshot. Hughes trial has been moved to April 29 with the pretrial taking place on April 1. — Photo Provided | The Cairo Citizen