2014 Junior Miss Cache Contestants

Junior Miss Cache Contestants – Front Row: Jenna DeWitt, Kailen Williams, Abagayle Britton, Gwendolyn Brewer; Back Row: Retiring Queen Mallory Ozment, Avery Osman, Macie Kesler Anna-Marie Quarcoo. Not shown: Madison Pitts, Mackenna Prout.
Junior Miss Cache Contestants – Front Row: Jenna DeWitt, Kailen Williams, Abagayle Britton, Gwendolyn Brewer; Back Row: Retiring Queen Mallory Ozment, Avery Osman, Macie Kesler Anna-Marie Quarcoo.
Not shown: Madison Pitts, Mackenna Prout. The Cache River Days Pageant is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. at the Leona Brust Civic Center on Friday, Sept. 5.

2014 Senior Miss Cache Contestants

Senior Miss Cache Contestants – Front Row: (L -R)  Grace Pitts, Hailey Ozment, Bailey Brewer, Madison Mowell; 2nd Row: Addison Osman, Hailey Crisman, Lacy Jordan, Ammiel Russell; 3rd Row: Breeann Johnson, Lesley Grace, Madelynn Smith, Cami Horman; Back Row: Retiring Queen Meghan Smith, Morgan Sadler, Cassidy Lance, Destiny Lynch, Jayden Wood.
Senior Miss Cache Contestants – Front Row: (L -R) Grace Pitts, Hailey Ozment, Bailey Brewer, Madison Mowell; 2nd Row: Addison Osman, Hailey Crisman, Lacy Jordan, Ammiel Russell; 3rd Row: Breeann Johnson, Lesley Grace, Madelynn Smith, Cami Horman; Back Row: Retiring Queen Meghan Smith, Morgan Sadler, Cassidy Lance, Destiny Lynch, Jayden Wood. The Cache River Days Pageant is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. at the Leona Brust Civic Center on Friday, Sept. 5.

Bosecker returns as Cairo Police Chief

Chief of Police John Bosecker
Chief of Police John Bosecker

John Bosecker was appointed as Chief of Police for the city of Cairo last week.
Bosecker returns to the post he held for 16 months about six years ago.
“I’ve learned a lot since I was here last,” said Bosecker.
“My main goal, right now, is community policing and police presence. We want to teach the public that we are there for them and trying to make it a safer place. Police presence is a deterrent and we can learn from the residents how we can better serve them – how Cairo can better serve them.”
Bosecker started police work in 1999 and has been his career ever since.
He also has over 10 years in the National Guard and Army Reserve, starting in artillery in the Guard and moving to Military Police in the Reserves.
According to Bosecker, the public can expect the policies and personnel to remain mostly unchanged.
“The policies are pretty good,” he said. “It’s enforcement. Expect to definitely see increased enforcement and special duties assigned to officers.”
“The public expects protection and that is what we are going to give them.”

Ash Wednesday Ushers in Lent

The beginning of Lent was marked by Ash Wednesday this week.  People throughout the country attended extra church services and received blessings as well as the ceremonious application of ashes to the forehead.

The ashes serve as a reminder of human mortality and as a sign of repentance.  The ashes are usually derived from the burning of palms from the previous year’s Palm Sunday.

A topic on the mind of many at this year’s Ash Wednesday was the shrinking number  of places for worship.  With congregations throughout the state consolidating due to closing parishes, many in the region attended the Ash Wednesday mass held at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Cairo.

Mary Caballero, a member a new member of the St. Patrick’s congregation stated that although the changes of venue have caused some difficulties, things are proceeding in a normal manner.

“Everybody’s ready for a new beginning,” said Cabellero.  “We’ve all been getting to know some new faces and it’s been a positive experience for the most part.”

Friar M.C. Mujule led the year’s Ash Wednesday mass and spoke of the changing of seasons as well as the journey that the season of Lent signifies.

“We devote ourselves during Lent as a way to experience what Christ went through,” said Mujule. “We do this through prayer, fasting, and arms giving.”

Mujule highlighted the importance of caring for others throughout the season and reminded those present of suggested canned and other food items which can often be important in a time of need. Nonperishables and canned meats and vegetables are always accepted at St. Patrick’s in Cairo.

Sunday mass for Alexander and Pulaski County Catholics takes place weekly at 11:00 a.m. in Cairo.

 

The Congregation at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Cairo gathered last week to begin the season of Lent on Ash Wednesday. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
The Congregation at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Cairo gathered last week to begin the season of Lent on Ash Wednesday. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Cairo Booster Society Aims to Make Changes in Town

The newly established Cairo Booster Society is making the positive change they want to see in the area.  Through recent beautification projects around Cairo and organization of meetings and events, the group aims to make Cairo a more enjoyable place to reside.

The Booster Society recently inducted 14 students from the 6th grade 4-H class at Cairo Junior High in an effort to spark interest among the younger population of the area.  These students will help with the ongoing projects planned.

President Tim Means stated that the first project planned for the City of Cairo is the rebuilding of a gazebo at the entrance of Halliday Park.

“It’s been a little cold lately so we’re really just waiting on the weather to break before we get rolling,” said Means.

The next meeting of the Cairo Booster Society is planned for 6 PM on March 13 at City Hall in Cairo.  All are welcome and encouraged to attend with ideas on ways Cairo can be improved.

 George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

Cairo High School Homecoming 2014

Alexis Murray and Jarvis Woodson were crowned Cairo High School's 2014 Homecoming king and queen.
Alexis Murray and Jarvis Woodson were crowned Cairo High School’s 2014 Homecoming king and queen. — Photo Provided | The Cairo Citizen

Cairo High School crowned their homecoming royalty on Saturday.  Jarvis Woodson and Alexis Murray were selected by the student body as the 2014 homecoming king and queen.  The school held a dance after the Homecoming basketball game against Lovejoy. — George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen 

 

Pyramid Chess Club Teaches Members New Moves

The Pyramid Chess Club, a gathering of students interested in the game of chess, has become a positive resource for all who are involved.

The club allows students who are involved the chance to progress their chess-playing abilities as well as socialize with peers who share the same interests and love of the game.

Members of The Pyramid Chess Club plan to attend the upcoming 6th Annual Metro Saint Louis Class Championship held on February 22 at the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis.

The annual tournament pits students of the same age groups against eachother over the course of three rounds.

Chess philosopher and editor of “The Chess Club Chronicles” newsletter Zayn Hollis describes playing chess as “seeing tactical patterns as a sphere rotating through the time-space continuum.”

While chess is seen merely as a game to some, others find the strategy and foresight utilized throughout the game as an ever evolving and progressing war between two opponents. Opponents command tiny armies and mount attacks, hoping to capture the other side’s king and queen.

“To me, chess is like a passport to wealthy living,” said Hollis.  I think of all the great minds and how they live and what they have done.”

The Pyramid Chess Club meets regularly throughout the school year and encourages those interested to check out what is offered.

Member’s of the Pyramid Chess Club pose for a photo with Mayor of Cairo Tyrone Coleman.  The club offers members the opportunity to progress their chess skills while playing with peers who share interest in the game. -- Photo Provided | The Cairo Citizen
Member’s of the Pyramid Chess Club pose for a photo with Mayor of Cairo Tyrone Coleman. The club offers members the opportunity to progress their chess skills while playing with peers who share interest in the game. — Photo Provided | The Cairo Citizen

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

All Stars Senior Program Teaches Life Lessons

Throughout the year area schools highlight the importance of abstinence from drugs, alcohol, and sex.  A major portion of high school health curriculum is based around the subject, as well as making positive life decisions.

Gabrielle Harris, the Addiction Prevention Director at Community Health and Emergency Service Incorporated, spoke to students about decision making, goal setting, communication, and stress managements a Century High School on Friday.  The class was part of the All-Star Senior Program at the high school and involved the Freshman health class.

Students got the chance throughout the class period to learn about several ways they can make positive decisions and influence their lives in a proper manner.  There was also time to apply the newly learned lessons in group activities which required students to get creative and come up with original ideas on how to communicate more efficiently.

Proper communication was a key element in the curriculum Friday.  After a brief discussion on the importance of the subject students explored the various forms of communication with a hands on approach.  After participating in skits and activities that illustrated how the world reacts to the differences in nonverbal and verbal communication.

“When you’re put in certain situations your verbal and nonverbal communication must match up, said Harris.  “It’s incredibly easy to send conflicting messages to the people around you.”

After exploring the concept of peer pressure students paired off to practice different responses to saying no to drugs and then illustrated them for the class, recieving applause and laughter upon completion.

“Peer pressure is a strong force in young-adult’s lives,” said Harris.  “It’s the pressure to conform to what others want and it can lead some people down the wrong paths.”

Harris reminded the teens about setting goals for themselves and the importance of commitment.  The topic of graduating from high school was explored.

“Everybody in this room can be successful,” said Harris.  “My expectation is for all of you to graduate.”

The class concluded on a discussion of empathy and the social and economic differences people throughout the region may have.

“It’s important to realize that not everyone has the same situation and privileges as others,” said Harris.

Gabrielle Harris, of Cairo, speaks to students during an excercise highlighting the importance of different forms of communication at Century High School in Ullin on Friday. Harris is the Addiction Prevention Director at Community Health & Emergency Service Inc.  “If you choose to live a drug-free life you have to understand that there will people out there that test you,” said Harris  Through the program students learn how to make good decisions, set goals, communicat, and resist peer pressure. The program is funded through the Department of Human Services and visits the area schools throughout the year. -- George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen
Gabrielle Harris, of Cairo, speaks to students during an excercise highlighting the importance of different forms of communication at Century High School in Ullin on Friday. Harris is the Addiction Prevention Director at Community Health & Emergency Service Inc.
“If you choose to live a drug-free life you have to understand that there will people out there that test you,” said Harris
Through the program students learn how to make good decisions, set goals, communicat, and resist peer pressure.
The program is funded through the Department of Human Services and visits the area schools throughout the year.
– George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen

George Lamboley | The Cairo Citizen